Glastonbury Highlights – Friday

The easiest way I could think of summarising my time at Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, is to take a day-by-day approach. These are my highlights of the first day of live music on Friday.

Skepta
Leading grime artist Skepta, took the Pyramid stage by storm at just before 2pm yesterday and for probably the “whitest” crowd he’s performed to, I doubt he’s performed to one with more engery. With hits like “That’s Not Me”, “Shutdown”, “Too Many Man” and “Man” being spat back to him by thousands of fans (including me) you couldn’t get a better atmosphere.

Occassionally crew members would run the sides chucking out merch to front row fans and Skepta was regularly joined on stage by members of his crew, like Frisco and Jammer, to keep the hype levels at Maximum and the grime flowing till the end.

Vant
At the small tent stage in William’s Green, Political Punk Indie Rock band Vant rocked out to a few hundred enthusiasts at around 5pm. Being a bit of a hipster fanboy, I pushed through and positioned myself on the rail.

After a few opening tracks to get the crowd ready, things got political with the frontman commenting on the results of the EU referendum – “if you voted to leave, get the F*** out of my tent!”.  Known songs like “Parking Lot”, “Fly-By Alien” and latest release “Karma Seeker” got things back on track.

Bring Me the Horizon
Metal core BMTH kicked off the evening music at 7:20pm over on the other stage. A video intro pre-warned fans that if they weren’t looking to get hurt, that they were at “the wrong show” and should “f***ing leave”. The video ended by comanding the crowd to open the centre creating a pit that was then told to grow wider, wider, and wider.

Starting with”happy song” BMTH followed up with songs like “Follow You”, “Shadow Moses”and “Can You Feel My Heart”, before ending on crowd favourite “Throne”. A truly heavy energetic experience that involved mosh pits, wall of deaths and crowd surfing, seemed out of place in the early evening before indie-pop band Bastille.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s